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  • Should I Grade-Skip My Gifted Child?

    Should I Grade-Skip My Gifted Child?

    The American school system puts students in grades based on age. However, for a large number of students, being with same-age peers in the classroom does not work. A recent report from Johns Hopkins University shows that about two out of every seven children are ready for a higher-grade curriculum.

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  • Gifted Kids: Parents Need To Watch For This Serious Downside

    Gifted Kids: Parents Need To Watch For This Serious Downside

    Who doesn't love the thought of having a bright child? Yet, there is a dark side to raising a gifted child. Research shows that gifted children and young adults are at higher risk for mental heath issues, including depression, anxiety and suicidal tendencies.

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  • Why Gifted Latinos Are Often Overlooked And Underserved

    Why Gifted Latinos Are Often Overlooked And Underserved

    Three million school children in the U.S. are identified as gifted. That's roughly the top 10 percent of the nation's highest achieving students. But Rene Islas, head of the National Association for Gifted Children, says tens of thousands of gifted English language learners are never identified.

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  • Have a Happy Holiday - Not an Exasperating One

    Have a Happy Holiday - Not an Exasperating One

    When the air turns crisp and the leaves glow brightly, our thoughts are captured by all the many fall and winter celebrations. The holidays traditionally bring with them merriment, joy, and peace. Or so the greeting cards say. Unfortunately, for some families with gifted children, the holiday celebrations may instead bring an uneasy joy, filled with challenging experiences.

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  • Gifted Children: The Differences Are Real

    Gifted Children: The Differences Are Real

    Gifted children. A whole lot has been written about them, and I've done my share of putting information out there about the ups and the downs of life with a gifted child. The parents who are raising gifted children and the teachers who understand gifted children know the complexity and uniqueness of giftedness in their children.

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  • Who Are The 'Gifted And Talented' And What Do They Need?

    Who Are The 'Gifted And Talented' And What Do They Need?

    With a child so bright, some parents might assume that she'd do great in any school setting, and pretty much leave it at that. But Turiello was convinced she needed a special environment, in part because of his own experience. He scored very high on IQ tests as a child, but almost dropped out of high school.

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  • Three Things Gifted Kids Need

    Three Things Gifted Kids Need

    We frequently hear that "gifted kids have it made," that they have all the advantages in life, and that they need nothing special. We also hear how gifted kids shouldn't be pressured to achieve, that we need to let them be kids. We hear that kids aren't really gifted if they don't achieve. We hear all kinds of things about gifted kids.

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  • Book Review: Gifted, Bullied, and Resilient

    Book Review: Gifted, Bullied, and Resilient

    During my elementary and high school years I moved upwards of twenty times. I was the perpetual new kid who was also too tall, poor and gifted - a walking target. When groups of girls bullied me, I was devastated but I wasn't surprised. After brief residencies at a couple different schools, I realized that kids everywhere were pretty much the same... and I was not.

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  • Why Early Reading Is a Sign of Giftedness

    Why Early Reading Is a Sign of Giftedness

    When my son began to read before he was 3 years old, I thought that he was a little different from the other kids I knew. I didn't know about giftedness back then, but I later learned that early reading was a sign that a child was gifted. Recently, however, there has been some disagreement about it.

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  • Fire Chasers: Intensities to the Extreme

    Fire Chasers: Intensities to the Extreme

    Dabrowski was onto something with his overexcitabilities (OE's) research. He recognized that different people experience certain stimuli in different ways - often way beyond those of other people. But perhaps there is one other distinct OE... the overexcitability of being intense about life itself - the intensity of being overexcited about everything.

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  • It's All About the Grades

    It's All About the Grades

    Why is it all about the academic output-the grades, the achievement, the scores? What about the high-ability, highly-intelligent or creatively gifted students who don't have the academic output-the grades-needed to be accepted into these programs? What happens to the gifted child who has the potential to be a mover and shaker for our world, but uses his knowledge and talents to create, innovate and invent instead of conforming to the traditional school norm of learning for the sole purpose of academic output.

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  • Twice-Exceptional: Giftedness Served Up with a Side of Lagging Skills

    Twice-Exceptional: Giftedness Served Up with a Side of Lagging Skills

    "Kids do well if they can." When I first heard these words, I sat up to listen more carefully. We've heard all kinds of words used to describe challenging students who may not be doing well: lazy, disruptive, immature, attention seeking, manipulative... These descriptors when coupled with behaviors like lying, crying, hitting, cheating tend to get an immediate reaction.

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  • Beyond the Classroom: When Does Nurturing a Gifted Child's Abilities Become Pushing?

    Beyond the Classroom: When Does Nurturing a Gifted Child's Abilities Become Pushing?

    Parents of high achieving students are advocates of their child's abilities, commonly at the front lines to ensure that their child has the opportunities for growth. Most often they are correct. But when does nurturing and accommodating become pushing?

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  • Is It Really So Terrible to Be Gifted?

    Is It Really So Terrible to Be Gifted?

    A recent article in Business Insider, entitled "Twenty reasons it's horrible to grow up 'gifted'" portrays the image of miserable, angry gifted adults, distressed because they were labeled gifted as children.

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  • The Science of Raising Happily Productive Kids with Dr. Dona Matthews

    The Science of Raising Happily Productive Kids with Dr. Dona Matthews

    Expert Dona Matthews presents ample research regarding how to help children flourish into happy and successful adults. Scott Barry Kaufman guides the interview across a wide array of vital domains including creativity, flow, standardized testing, growth mindsets and the many myths about intelligence.

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  • My Smart Kid Is So Emotional - Am I A Parenting Failure?

    My Smart Kid Is So Emotional - Am I A Parenting Failure?

    Your child is emotional. Anxious. Melting down. Telling you that you're the worst parent. Ever. Not in so many words, necessarily. But still. You know that you're the worst parent. Ever.

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  • 25 of our favorite gifted kid movies

    25 of our favorite gifted kid movies

    In the spirit of the Academy Awards, we thought we would share a list of good movies featuring gifted children and young adults. Based on a discussion on the IEA Facebook page and a poll of the IEA staff, here are some of our community's favorite movies about gifted kids (and gifted grown kids).

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  • Does differentiation work?

    Does differentiation work?

    Jeffrey Shoemaker, a contributor for Ramblings of a Gifted Teacher, writes: "Last week I was on Twitter, and came across an article by Jim Delisle. I have read many articles, and few books by Jim. I have a lot of respect for him and his work. In this article I think there are some good points, and some points that I don't necessarily agree with."

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  • Gifted students have fewer allies than you'd think, but can count on this billionaire

    Gifted students have fewer allies than you'd think, but can count on this billionaire

    In recent years, a big buzzword in education has been "gifted students." The term sometimes draws accusations of elitism, conjuring images of frenzied parents of privilege priming hothouse kids for the Ivy League and beyond. However, the National Association for Gifted Children notes that many of the nation's three million gifted kids come from "all cultures, racial and ethnic backgrounds, and socioeconomic groups."

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  • Gifted children: Just pulling the wool over your eyes

    Gifted children: Just pulling the wool over your eyes

    Celi Trépanier, a contributor for Crushing Tall Poppies, writes: "If there is just one thing I wish every person who does not understand giftedness, and yes, I did say every, could realize is that giftedness often comes packaged with intense emotional over excitablities that could mimic, at any given moment, a unintentional nuclear explosion. This is an inborn behavior trait, not spoiled, arrogant or disrespectful behavior."

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  • The imposter syndrome and gifted children

    The imposter syndrome and gifted children

    Jeffrey Shoemaker, a contributor for Ramblings of a Gifted Teacher, writes: "Just a few weeks ago I wrote about an observation about what was happening with some of my female students. After reading some of the comments, I thought I had to educate myself about this syndrome."

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  • The most common comments gifted parents hear

    The most common comments gifted parents hear

    Braver than you Believe Braver Believe, a contributor for Braver than you Believe, writes: "Since that fateful time when we finally found out what ailed Kid #1 (i.e., giftedness), I've worked with a lot of other parents in the same position from all over the world in a lot of different mediums — face-to-face, email, telephone, Facebook groups. And the stuff they talk about hearing from others is pretty similar to what I've heard over the years."

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  • Bright kids: America's most underserved group

    Bright kids: America's most underserved group

    Imagine you're in the third grade and reading on a fifth grade level. You're required to listen to kids struggle to read aloud third grade level books or to help a child who's still having trouble with The Cat in the Hat.

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  • Gifted students can have learning disabilities

    Gifted students can have learning disabilities

    Twice-exceptional (or 2E) children can have extra burdens on them, more so than other gifted children, for several reasons which are related to the simple fact that children's giftedness or higher-than-average intelligence is often masked, offset or overshadowed by their learning differences or disabilities in school. Given the well-known fact that too many educational professionals in our school systems today seem to only recognize gifted children as those who are very intelligent and excel in the classroom, we then fail to identify many gifted children who may not fit this stereotype, and fitting this stereotype can be especially difficult if the specific educational needs of the gifted child are not being met.

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  • Are all gifted children early readers?

    Are all gifted children early readers?

    It's true that many gifted children read at a remarkably early age, amazing family and preschool teachers alike with their almost eerie knowledge of language. Many of these children are also highly verbal, possess a large vocabulary, and seem to grasp humor, subtlety and other nuances of speech well beyond their years. These become the kids who drag home wheelbarrows full of books from the library, walk into walls because they are always reading, and keep a book hidden on their laps during school to cope with boredom.

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  • Portraits of profound giftedness

    Portraits of profound giftedness

    Irene Hila's blog seeks to demystify the concept and image of being gifted and raising gifted children. "Starlight, star bright, first star I see tonight, I wish I may I wish I might, accelerate a grade tonight. When I looked down into the big beautiful eyes of my newborn baby girl, I did not whisper a prayer of acceleration. When she wrapped her little fingers around mine for the first time, I did not wish upon a star that she would have the gift of missing out on some of the most beloved moments of being a toddler and a preschooler. That first long night full of snuggles and tiredness, I did not identify the first star and wish upon it so that my daughter could skip right over the next few years."

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  • Gifted students do not always excel in schools

    Gifted students do not always excel in schools

    Celi Trépanier, a contributor for Crushing Tall Poppies, writes: "In my most recent blog post A Gifted Child Checklist for Teachers, I listed ten basic characteristics and traits of gifted children — really nine since I repeated #1 because it's a biggee. It is a list intended to easily help teachers and others by providing a brief and basic listing of gifted traits and characteristics which aren't always so well-known, recognized or obvious. I also hoped my checklist would bust some myths and correct some incorrect information about giftedness."

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  • Why are we so nervous about parents?

    Why are we so nervous about parents?

    Research tells us that parents are excellent identifiers of giftedness in their children. Analysis by the Gifted Development Center in Colorado found that "84 percent of 1,000 children whose parents felt that they exhibited 3/4 of the traits in our Characteristics of Giftedness Scale tested in the superior or gifted range. Over 95 percent demonstrated giftedness in at least one area, but were asynchronous in their development, and their weaknesses depressed their composite IQ scores." (Linda Silverman, 2009)1Yet far too many parents still have a very difficult time being heard by teachers when it comes to addressing their child's giftedness.

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