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    Incoming ninth-graders can develop workforce-ready skills at Career Institutes

    Current eight-graders can register online to attend a Dallas ISD Career Institute (CI), where they can learn and master skills that are in high demand in a variety of industries.

    The district’s three CIs offer industry-standard training and career and technical education in eight diverse pathways. Upon completion of each pathway course, students can earn industry-based certifications and become workforce-ready for high-skill, high-paying, high-demand jobs.

    Most Dallas ISD traditional high schools will offer access to one of the three CI campuses, depending upon their location. The three CI campuses are scheduled to open at the beginning of the upcoming school year in August 2020. Depending on the designated CI campus, students can study the following pathways:

    • Aviation
    • Construction and Carpentry
    • Electrical and Solar Technology
    • Interior Design
    • Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration
    • Plumbing and Pipefitting
    • Mechatronics/Advanced Manufacturing
    • Cybersecurity

    Incoming ninth-grade or current ninth grade students can fill out this Google Form or contact their school counselor to enroll into a CI program for the upcoming school year.

    Approximately 800 freshmen enrolled in a CI program during the 2019-2020 school year. The current students are taking a Principles of Construction class at their home campus in preparation for the CI campus opening.

    Beginning in August 2020, students will spend half the school day at their home campus and half the day at a Career Institute every other day. The days spent at the CI vary depending on the high school.

    Free transportation to and from the Career Institute campus

    Dallas ISD will provide free transportation for all CI students from their home-campus and back, every other school day. Students will spend 180 minutes (two class periods, plus lunch) at their respective CI campus.

    The CI periods will be split into a morning and an afternoon shift.

    Students from the a.m. shift will be transported from their home campus to the CI, as soon as they arrive at school in the morning. They will stay at the CI for two periods and lunch, and will be transported back to their high school to continue with their core classes.

    The students in the p.m. shift will be transported to the career institute, where they will have lunch and will take two classes. Afterwards they will be returned to their high school, where they can catch the bus home or stay at the campus for extracurricular activities.

    Approximately 1,300 incoming freshmen have expressed an interest in joining for the upcoming school year. Students and parents who wish to learn more regarding the campus designation, the transportation system and the pathways can visit: https://www.dallasisd.org/careerinstitutes


    Dallas NAF Academies experience the largest growth of distinguished academies in one year.

    Dallas ISD has been proud to acknowledge that 14 of our NAF Academies are at the distinguished level.  To reach the distinguished level, the academy must be operational for four years, participate in Work based Learning, Internships, track their student data, complete cross-curricular projects,  and have a graduating class. 

     Several Dallas Academies were reviewed this spring to be considered for this honor.  I am proud to announce that we have grown from 14 distinguished academies to 23!  This is the largest growth of distinguished academies in one year in the NAF network.  Below please see our new list of Distinguished Academies and the press release from NAF.

     

    1. Bryan Adams High School Leadership Academy, Academy of Health Sciences – Dallas, TX
    2. Emmett J. Conrad High School, Academy of Engineering – Dallas, TX
    3. Emmett J. Conrad High School, Academy of Finance – Dallas, TX
    4. Emmett J. Conrad High School, Academy of Health Sciences – Dallas, TX
    5. Emmett J. Conrad High School, Academy of Hospitality & Tourism – Dallas, TX
    6. Emmett J. Conrad High School, Academy of Information Technology – Dallas, TX
    7. H. Grady Spruce High School, Academy of Engineering – Dallas, TX (*new this year)
    8. H. Grady Spruce High School, Academy of Finance – Dallas, TX (*new this year)
    9. H. Grady Spruce High School, Academy of Information Technology – Dallas, TX (*new this year)
    10. Innovation Design Entrepreneurship Academy (IDEA), Academy of Finance – Dallas, TX (*new this year)
    11. Justin F. Kimball High School, Academy of Engineering – Dallas, TX
    12. Justin F. Kimball High School, Academy of Hospitality & Tourism – Dallas, TX
    13. North Dallas High School, Academy of Information Technology – Dallas, TX
    14. Skyline High School, Academy of Hospitality & Tourism – Dallas, TX
    15. South Oak Cliff High School, Academy of Engineering – Dallas, TX (*new this year)
    16. Sunset High School, Academy of Health Sciences – Dallas, TX (*new this year)
    17. Thomas Jefferson High School, Academy of Engineering – Dallas, TX
    18. Thomas Jefferson High School, Academy of Hospitality & Tourism – Dallas, TX
    19. W. H. Adamson High School, Academy of Finance – Dallas, TX
    20. W.H. Adamson High School, Academy of Health Sciences – Dallas, TX (*new this year)
    21. Wilmer-Hutchins High School, Academy of Information Technology – Dallas TX (*new this year)
    22. Woodrow Wilson High School, Academy of Finance – Dallas, TX
    23. Woodrow Wilson High School, Academy of Hospitality & Tourism – Dallas, TX

     

    Richard Grimsley, Director

    Career and Technical Education

    Dallas ISD

     logo


    Dallas ISD Career Institutes are recruiting current eighth-graders interested in future good-wage jobs


    Dallas ISD is recruiting current eighth-graders interested in attending a Career Institute next school year. At a Career Institute, students can develop and grow in-demand skills they need to secure a good-wage job in the near future.

    Interested students can simply fill out this form and the information will be sent to their counselor.

    More than 800 current freshmen this school year are enrolled in a Career Institute program. The students are taking the Principles of Construction class at their home campus in preparation for the three dedicated Career Institutes opening August 2020. Starting their sophomore year, students enrolled in the program will spend half the school day at their home campus and half the day at a Career Institute.

    “We understand that while some students will enter college directly after high school graduation, other students will need to join the workforce immediately, and still others may need to work while they attend college or pursue postsecondary education,” Dallas ISD Assistant Superintendent Oswaldo Alvarenga said. “This is a career and tech education program that will guide students from concept to hands-on training with instruction by experienced tradesmen with firsthand experience and the contacts to connect students to internships, apprenticeships, and jobs in their industry.”

    The FREE Career Institute Pathways are:

    • Aviation
    • Construction and Carpentry
    • Electrical and Solar Technology
    • Interior Design
    • Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration
    • Plumbing and pipefitting
    • Mechatronics/Advanced Manufacturing
    • Cybersecurity

    Interested families can go here to learn more.

     


    7 facts about the STEM workforce

    (fotografixx via Getty Images)
    (fotografixx via Getty Images)

    Employment in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) occupations has grown 79% since 1990, from 9.7 million to 17.3 million, outpacing overall U.S. job growth. There’s no single standard for which jobs count as STEM, and this may contribute to a number of misperceptions about who works in STEM and the difference that having a STEM-related degree can make in workers’ pocketbooks.

    new Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data takes a broad-based look at the STEM workforce from 1990 to 2016 based on an analysis of adults ages 25 and older working in any of 74 occupations. These include computer, math, engineering and architecture occupations, physical scientists, life scientists and health-related occupations such as health care practitioners and technicians, but not health care support workers such as nursing aides and medical assistants.

    Here are seven facts about the STEM workforce and STEM training.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


    Life in Balance: Getting girls into STEM creates more than gender equality

      
    Kim Fields
     
     
    Retrieved March 18, 2019 from https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/gender-equality/life-in-balance-getting-girls-into-stem-creates-more-than-gender-equality/ar-BBT9aOp?li=BBnb7Kz
     
     
     
    Getting girls into STEM creates more than gender equality
     

    Editor’s note: In honor of International Women's Day and Women's History Month, Microsoft News is working to empower women and girls in STEM fields. You can find many useful resources here for closing the STEM gap. Encourage girls to pursue STEM by making a donation to our nonprofit partner Girls Who Code to provide need-based scholarships and stipends for summer coding programs.

     

    There's a push in Idaho to get more young girls interested in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math, also known as STEM.  in this week's Life in Balance, the movement is about more than creating gender equality.

    She Tech is a day-long event at Boise State where 250 high school girls throughout the Treasure Valley are encouraged to touch, explore, interact, and of course, have fun with technology.

    "The hope is that the girls leave here with a better understanding of what it means to be an engineer, a scientist, to work in technology," Alecia Hoobing, the co-founder of Women Innovators in Boise.

    Women make up only 21.6 percent of those working in STEM fields in Idaho. Of the 333 computer science graduates at Idaho's universities in 2015, only 50 were female, according to Women Innovators website.

    "I think that our society has done a disservice to these fields and somehow we've branded them as male-dominated fields. And girls aren't even attracted to them," Hoobing said.

    She is working to change that.

    "We're really trying to figure out how to re-brand engineering for girls and women. You know they need to see role models and that's why we're here today," Hoobing said.

    Events like these aren't just about creating gender equality. STEM professionals will help solve the problems of tomorrow. Hoobing argues without more women in STEM professions, tomorrow's innovations and discoveries can only go so far.

    "You know, this morning when I was talking to the girls, I posed the question, 'Do you want your dad, your brother, your boyfriend or your favorite male influence in your life solving all of the world's problems for you? Do they understand your needs entirely?' And there was a resounding, 'No, ew!'" Hoobing said.

    It happened last year to FitBit when they came under fire for a flaw in their menstruation tracker on Versa watch, a watch that was supposed to be more female-focused.

    Its software limited tracking a menstrual cycle to 10 days leaving one reviewer to write: "Locking the entire female population into a 10 day period makes me wonder how many women were involved in creating this feature... please fix."

    "I mean we're the ones that solve these problems so we need a diverse group of people to solve them so we can represent all the different needs and constituents," Hoobing said.

    Idaho is making strides in STEM education overall, especially when it comes to computer science. Computing careers are expected to grow by 14 percent over the next five years.

    By next year, the state's goal is to offer at least one computer science course for every high schooler in the state, with all middle and elementary schools offered one by 2022, according to Idaho STEM Action Center.

    "Really what we're trying to show is that it's for everybody," Hoobing said.

    The goal is for young women across Idaho and the Treasure Valley to be part of the problem solvers of tomorrow in all STEM fields.

    "I absolutely love math and science so I kind of want to see if I can combine those things and get a degree in engineering," Taylor Lark, a junior at Eagle High School, said.

    "Computer science is where I'm going," Emma Pittman, a junior at Meridian Medical Arts Charter said.

    Olivia Prezzano, a senior at Bishop Kelley High School, said, "I'm really into biology. So I'm really into the idea of mixing the biological studies and math studies."

     


  •  78 Career and Technical Education Facts for 2019

     

    Note: Page last updated 1/18/2019.

    Retrieved on March 18, 2019 from https://www.aeseducation.com/career-technical-education-facts-that-prove-its-awesome

     

    Career and technical education (CTE) has become a major pillar of the American education system over the past several years.

    Previously called vocational education or vo-tech, CTE provides students with real-world skills that they need to enter the workforce in 16 different industries.

    But there’s one big question about CTE that’s hard to answer — does it actually work?

    On this page, you’ll see conclusive evidence that CTE is a nationwide phenomenon that does everything from increasing high school graduation rates to boosting the overall US economy. 

    Just like our products and website, we’ll keep this page up-to-date at all time with the freshest facts on CTE.

    For reference, CTE includes 16 career clusters (also known as “tracks”).

    what-is-cte-infographic-final

    Let’s start with an eagle-eye view of CTE in general before jumping into each career cluster.

    General CTE Stats

    00-cte-general-stats

    1. CTE has 16 career clusters / tracks
    2. 7.4 million secondary students and 4 million post-secondary students are interested in CTE nationwide
    3. Between 2000 and 2014, the number of for-profit CTE institutions increased by about 68.7%
    4. 95% of CTE students graduate high school, which is 10% higher than the national average
    5. 78% of CTE graduates enroll in post-secondary education full-time
    6. Between 2012 and 2022, there will be 50,557,900 job openings for CTE graduates
    7. Of those jobs, 15,627,500 (30.9%) will be new
    8. The United States has 1,200 career and technology centers in 41 states
    9. The Perkins Act is the main source of funding for CTE programs nationwide
    10. Perkins funding can cover up to 100% of CTE materials costs, including digital curriculum
    11. Students enrolling in post-secondary CTE courses are eligible for federal financial aid
    12. 94% of today’s high school students experience some degree of CTE courses
    13. In 2014, 7.5 million high school students earned at least one CTE credit
    14. 91% of high school graduates who earned 2-3 CTE credits enrolled in college
    15. 81% of high school dropouts say real-world skills education would’ve kept them in school
    16. For every $1 of government funding in CTE, taxpayers earn as much as $12.20 in benefits in return
    17. Technical and applied science graduates earn $2,000 to $11,000 more per year than those with a bachelor’s degree
    18. 27% of people with an associate’s degree or less out-earn those with a bachelor’s degree
    19. 1/3 of CTE students are enrolled in programs preparing them for careers in leading industries
    1. In 2014, students earned a total of 3,842,589 CTE credentials in the United States
    2. Earned credentials have increased 62.7% since 2000
    3. In 2014, these states awarded the most CTE credentials
    • California (468,478)
    • Florida (273,551)
    • Texas (260,127)
    • New York (235,928)
    • Illinois (165,225)

     

    1. 1/3 of all high school dual enrollment credits come from CTE courses (600,000 total)
    2. 82% of CTE students say they’re “satisfied” with career opportunities
    3. 80% of CTE students say CTE classes helped them “know where they were headed
    4. 70% of CTE students say entering a CTE program of study helped them get better grades
    5. 64.7% of post-secondary CTE students enroll in public two-year institutions
    6. 45% of CTE students say it used real-world examples to help them understand classwork
    7. Between 2011 and 2012, 34% of students seeking certificates had already earned a certificate or degree
    8. 20.4% of post-secondary CTE students enroll in private for-profit institutions
    9. In 48 states, high school graduate rates for CTE students are 3%-22% higher than state averages

     

    Track 1. Health Science

    01-track-health-science

    1. Median annual wage for careers in health care: $28,710
    2. 11 of the 20 fastest-growing jobs are in the health care field
    3. From 2016 to 2026, the five fastest-growing jobs in health science are:
    • Home health aides
    • Personal care aides
    • Physician assistants
    • Nurse practitioners
    • Physical therapist assistants

     

    1. Health care careers will grow 18% between 2016 and 2026much faster than the US average
    2. Health care jobs continued to grow during the most recent US recession
    3. From 1990 to 2009, interest in health science increased 222%
    4. From 2002 to 2012, health science certificates and associate’s degrees grew 137%
    5. 36% of all CTE students in 2012 pursued a career in the health science career cluster
    6. Between 2011 and 2012, 42% of all students seeking certificates enrolled in health science
    7. HOSA-Future Health Professionals, the career and technical student organization for health science, has more than 200,000 members

     

    Track 2. Business

    02-track-business

    1. Median annual wage for careers in business and finance: $67,710
    2. From 2016 to 2026, there will be more than 773,800 new jobs in business
    3. From 2012 to 2022, the five fastest-growing jobs in business are:
    • Customer service representatives
    • Office clerks
    • Operations managers
    • Secretaries and administrative assistants
    • Stock clerks

     

    1. From 2003 to 2012, interest in business certificates decreased from 11% to 5% of all students

     

    Track 3. Sales

    03-track-sales

    1. Median annual wage$27,020
    2. From 2016 to 2026, the jobs with the best outlook in sales are:
    • Insurance agent sales
    • Sales engineers
    • Real estate brokers / sales agents
    • Financial services sales
    • Wholesale sales representatives

     

    Track 4. Finance

    04-track-finance

    1. Median annual wage$66,530
    2. From 2012 to 2022, the five fastest-growing jobs in finance are:
    • Accountants
    • Tellers
    • Bill collectors
    • Insurance agents
    • Financial managers

     

    Track 5. Information Technology

    05-track-information-technology

    1. Median annual wage$84,580
    2. From 2016 to 2026 IT jobs with the best outlook are:
    • Information security analysts
    • Software developers
    • IT research scientists
    • Web developers
    • Computer support specialists

     

    Track 6. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM)

    06-track-stem

    1. Median annual wage$77,900 (roughly)
    2. From 2016 to 2026, about 194,500 new jobs are projected to be added
    3. From 2012 to 2022, the five fastest-growing jobs in STEM are:
    • Mechanical engineers
    • Industrial engineers
    • Architectural and engineering managers
    • Electrical engineers
    • Environmental scientists

     

    Track 7. Manufacturing

    07-track-manufacturing

    1. Median annual wage$33,990
    2. Manufacturing is made up of 7 national career pathways
    3. From 2012 to 2022, the five fastest-growing jobs in manufacturing are:
    • Maintenance and repair workers
    • Team assemblers
    • Industrial machinery mechanics
    • First-line supervisors
    • Inspectors

     

    Track 8. Transportation & Logistics

    08-track-logistics

    1. Median annual wage$31,600
    2. From 2016 to 2026, employment in transportation and logistics will add 634,400 new jobs

     

    Track 9. Hospitality

    09-track-hospitality

    1. Median annual wage: Varies widely
    2. From 2012 to 2022, the five fastest-growing jobs in hospitality are:
    • Food preparation
    • Restaurant servers
    • Janitors
    • Housekeepers
    • Restaurant cooks

     

    Track 10. Government

    10-track-government

    1. Average annual wage$51,340
    2. From 2012 to 2022, the five fastest-growing jobs in government are:
    • Compliance officers
    • Government program interviewers
    • Construction and building inspectors
    • Court and municipal clerks
    • Tax collectors

     

    Track 11. Law

    11-track-law

    1. Median annual wage$49,500
    2. From 2012 to 2022, the five fastest-growing jobs in law are:
    • Security guards
    • Police and sheriff’s patrol officers
    • Lawyers
    • Correctional officers
    • Paralegals

     

    Track 12. Agriculture

    12-track-agriculture

    1. Median annual wage$66,360
    2. Agriculture is the only CTE cluster that is projected to show little change in employment from 2016 to 2026
    3. From 2012 to 2022, the five fastest-growing jobs in agriculture are:
    • Crop, nursery, and greenhouse labor
    • Farmers, ranchers, and agricultural managers
    • Non-farm animal caretakers
    • Refuse and recyclable material collectors
    • Water and wastewater treatment plant operators

     

    Track 13. Human Services

    13-track-human-services

    1. Median annual wage$31,810
    2. From 2012 to 2022, the five fastest-growing jobs in human services are:
    • Personal care aides
    • Childcare workers
    • Cosmetologists
    • Social and human service assistants
    • Social workers

     

    Track 14. Construction

    14-track-construction

    1. Median annual wage$44,730
    2. From 2012 to 2022, the five fastest-growing jobs in construction are:
    • Laborers
    • Landscaping and grounds-keeping
    • Carpenters
    • Electricians
    • Construction trade supervisors

     

    Track 15. Education & Training

    15-track-training

    1. Median annual wage$48,740
    2. From 2012 to 2022, the five fastest-growing jobs in training are:
    • Elementary school instructors
    • Teacher assistants
    • Secondary school instructors
    • Other instructors
    • Middle school instructors

     

    Track 16. Arts, Audio/Visual Technology, and Communications

    16-track-arts

    1. Median annual wage: Varies widely
    2. From 2012 to 2022, the five fastest-growing jobs in arts, A/V, and communications are:
    • Graphic designers
    • Musicians
    • Telecommunications line installers
    • Telecommunications installers
    • Producers and directors

     

     
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